Menopause

What is menopause and what to do about it?

Women undergo another change in hormone levels at around the age of 45-50. At this point the ovaries become unable to produce normal amounts of female hormones. This is known as menopause. When the process begins there may be irregularities in the menstrual cycle until finally it ceases altogether. This can have a negative effect on many aspects of health as estrogen serves many functions including protecting the heart and bones. There are also various other negative side effects caused by menopause such as hot flashes and bone loss.

Women who are experiencing irregular periods, night sweats and all the other lovely symptoms that go along with menopause may feel they’re doing a crazy dance called the menopause hormone bounce. Their moods may bounce up and down like a rubber ball due to the menopause hormone changes.

While some fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone hormone levels does occur during menopause and makes a woman feel as if they’re bouncing, menopause hormone levels are truly decreasing. In the early or perimenopause stage as it’s often called, the changes may be slight, then level off. This is likely to be followed by another drop in hormone levels. It’s this dropping and leveling off, then dropping and leveling off that causes a woman to feel as if she’s undergoing menopause hormone bouncing.

The main problem with menopause is that there is a drastic reduction in production of the female hormones. This is what causes all the physical discomfort and hot flashes in menopause. The popular line of treatment is to take menopause hormones externally. Substitution of menopause hormones can be in the form of oral medication or it can be local application in the form of topical ointments.

It is important to take these menopause hormones strictly under a doctor’s guidance. A doctor studies the patient’s symptoms and entire family history and then recommends the correct dose and combination of menopause hormones. This ensures that the patient is not at risk and is taking the right menopause hormone.

Women can take either one or both menopause hormones depending on their physical condition and age. Women who have undergone a hysterectomy must take both estrogen and progesterone. Such women have a greater risk of heart disease, blood clots and breast cancer. Women taking estrogen alone have a chance of suffering a stroke.

Menopause hormones give good relief from hot flashes and vaginal dryness. There is no proof that they prevent heart disease or improve one’s general health. The benefits of menopause hormones vary with age. Women with early menopause greatly benefit from a short course of menopause hormones. Older women who take menopause hormones have a greater risk of developing breast cancer or tumors.